Good afternoon
Good afternoon
Guest
Please welcome crystaltong, our newest member.

86 Guests, 0 Users
 

Steve.Deserved.Better

June 19, 2017, 09:17:36 AM
It's Summer in Ohio finally!  Enjoy and have a safe one!
 

Steve.Deserved.Better

April 24, 2017, 06:51:59 PM
If you mean, me myself and I.  Then yes.  Hey Runner!!! How ya doing?!
 

runner76

April 23, 2017, 09:32:38 PM
Steve.Deserved.Better, do you mean 'I am he as you are he as you are me
and we are all together"?




 

Steve.Deserved.Better

April 17, 2017, 09:25:21 AM
You were here and I wasn't and now I'm here and you aren't.  Have a great day!!
 

"V"

April 17, 2017, 07:41:44 AM
?????

This Week is National Adult Immunization Awareness Week


August 20, 2015 - 11:30 AM


In the United States, vaccines have greatly reduced infectious diseases that once routinely killed or harmed many infants, children, and adults. However, the viruses and bacteria that cause vaccine-preventable disease still exist and can be passed on to people who are not protected by vaccines. Every year, thousands of Americans still suffer serious health problems, are hospitalized, and even die from diseases that could be prevented by vaccines. Protect your health and the health of your family. Make sure you and your loved ones are up-to-date on recommended vaccines.


Here’s why you shouldn’t wait:

•Many vaccine-preventable diseases are still common in the U.S.
•Those that are not common here are still found in other parts of the world, and can still be a threat.
•Some of these diseases are very contagious.
•Any of these diseases could be serious – even for healthy people.

•Certain people may be at higher risk for getting some diseases or having more serious illness if they were to get sick, like young children, older adults, and those with health conditions.Vaccines are our best protection against a number of serious, and sometimes deadly, diseases.


Every year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other medical experts update vaccine recommendations for children, teens, and adults based on the latest research and evidence-based science on vaccine safety, effectiveness, and patterns of vaccine-preventable diseases

You have the power to protect yourself and the ones you love. Talk to your healthcare professional about which vaccines are right for you and your family.

According to the Knox County Health Department, all adults should get the influenza (flu) vaccine each year to protect against seasonal flu. Every adult should also get the Td or Tdap vaccine once if they did not receive it as an adolescent to protect against pertussis (whooping cough), and then a Td (tetanus, diphtheria) booster shot every 10 years. In addition, women are also recommended to get the Tdap vaccine each time they are pregnant, preferably at 27 through 36 weeks.

Adults may need other vaccines – such as shingles, pneumococcal, hepatitis, HPV – depending on one’s age, occupation, travel, health status, vaccination history, and other risk factors.

Most private health insurance plans cover the cost of recommended vaccines.The Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program helps provide vaccines to children whose parents or guardians may not be able to afford them. Medicare and Medicaid also cover a number of vaccines for adults. Vaccines are available at private doctor offices, as well as other convenient locations such as pharmacies, workplaces, community health clinics, and health departments.

Share on Facebook! Share on Twitter! g+ Reddit Digg this story! Del.icio.us StumbleUpon

Comments *

You don't have permmission to comment, or comments have been turned off for this article.